Friday’s Finds: October 9, 2015

Every week I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on the internet that struck a chord with me. I call these: Friday’s Finds. Please excuse the messy start, as I find my rhythm for these posts.

This week I spent a bit of time looking at Precision Ag, and the Agriculture industry in general.  There is of course a lot of press about how technology will impact Ag and a lot of stylized stories on how tech will impact farmers.

TechCrunch has a pretty good review of the opportunities:

It talks about the hot opportunities, like drones:

  • An In-Depth Report on FAA Drones Regulations and their Impact on Ag – AgFunderNews
    Depending on a drone’s technology, and the camera equipment housed within it, drones are being built to offer farmers more than just simple aerial images of their land. In some instances, this involves using near-infrared technology, which can show farmers when a field is lacking in water or nutrients from the color of a field an image presents. This enables farmers to deploy their resources more efficiently and solve problems more quickly.

irrigation:

robots:

  • Agri-tech at the forefront of Precision Agriculture Revolution | Agri-Tech Strategy
    Professor Simon Blackmore Head of Engineering at Harper Adams University has said: Agricultural robotics are now being developed in the UK to drive tractors, kill weeds with lasers to avoid using chemicals, pick and grade strawberries, mow grass, scout for pests, weeds and diseases (both aerial and ground based) and plant seeds. This new wave of smart machines will revolutionise the way in which we grow crops in the future by using intelligently targeted inputs.

variable rate applications:

  • 2015 Precision Agriculture Dealer Survey: Top Four Trends To Watch | CropLife
    In conclusion, the big data and aerial collection of data will be important to watch over the next couple years. As UAVs and satellite imagery is coupled with yield monitor analysis and field maps, big data level decision, such as VRT seeding prescriptions, will be what the industry will watch moving forward. Just as in the last two years, advancements in computing power will take us closer to harnessing and fully developing the potential of precision agriculture and the systems in which agricultural data are collected, analyzed and implemented in decisions.

and apps. Where would we be without apps?

  • Old MacDonald Had an App | HP
    “We talk a lot about technology and automation and how agriculture is evolving to do more and more with less and less,” he says. “But none of this happens without people. There is no machine for picking a fresh fruit or a tomato. It takes the touch of a human being to run these technological systems.”

We also need to have great adoption plans for this technology. I appears that this “secret sauce” for enterprise IT adopt could be applied more liberally in this industry.

  • 2015 Precision Agriculture Dealer Survey: Top Four Trends To Watch | CropLife
    In conclusion, the big data and aerial collection of data will be important to watch over the next couple years. As UAVs and satellite imagery is coupled with yield monitor analysis and field maps, big data level decision, such as VRT seeding prescriptions, will be what the industry will watch moving forward. Just as in the last two years, advancements in computing power will take us closer to harnessing and fully developing the potential of precision agriculture and the systems in which agricultural data are collected, analyzed and implemented in decisions.

Read the report. We still have work for more and better adoption.

But where does this all lead? Hopefully better return, and more sustainable farming. I don’t necessarily mean the soil is better, or the water will last 100 years; although that is most certainly part of it. It’s also about being able to pass down the hard work to value to the next generation.

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Friday’s Finds: October 9, 2015

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